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Gluten Free Oatmeal Millet Bread

This Gluten Free Oatmeal Millet Bread is a hearty, soft loaf of bread that can be used for everything from sandwiches to toast.


It’s a full-sized loaf of bread, so it’s much larger than any of the pre-made gluten-free loaves you’ll find in stores. The texture on the inside is tender and springy. It’s hard to resist cutting off an end chunk while the bread is still warm and slathering it with ghee!

I make my own oat flour by grinding gluten-free rolled oats in my food processor or high speed blender. If you’re worried about the gluten-free purity of your oats, I highly recommend the GF Harvest brand of oats. You can read all about their purity protocol here.

Why not buy already ground gluten-free oat flour? Plain and simple: it tastes bad. You don’t want to, trust me.

This recipe has been edited as of 01/12/18. The original recipe ingredients are at the bottom of this post.

I originally created this recipe years ago. Since creating it, I’ve learned a thing or two about yeast, and gluten-free bread recipes in general. I feel this new edited version is better, think Gluten-Free Oatmeal Millet Bread 2.0. I hope you all think so too.

Gluten-Free Oatmeal Millet Bread Recipe (edited version)

Yeast Ingredients
1 teaspoon organic cane sugar
1 1/4 cup warm water (between 110 – 115 degrees F)
2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (NOT instant yeast)

Wet Ingredients
3 eggs, at room temperature
1/4 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons honey
2 tsp apple cider vinegar

Dry Ingredients
1 cup millet flour
1 cup tapioca starch
1/2 cup freshly ground oat flour**
1/2 cup sorghum flour
1/2 cup brown rice flour
2 3/4 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 1/4 tsp sea salt

Extra whole rolled oats to sprinkle on top of your loaf.

Directions:
In a small mixing bowl, combine the organic cane sugar and the warm water; mix well.  Sprinkle in the yeast and give it a quick stir to combine.  Allow to proof for 10 minutes (set a timer!) – NO more, NO less time.  Make sure you have the other wet and dry ingredients mixed and ready to go when the 10 minutes are up! 

Using a heavy duty mixer, combine the dry ingredients.

In a separate mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, oil, honey, and vinegar.

When the yeast is done proofing, add the wet ingredients to the dry.  Stir until it’s a little paste-like, then add the yeast mixture.  Using your mixer’s low speed setting, mix for about 30 seconds.  Scrape the sides of the bowl then mix on medium for about 2 minutes or until the dough is smooth.  (You may need to stop your mixer and scrape the sides of your bowl a few more times.)

Pour dough into a well greased 9″ x 5″ bread pan, sprinkle with oats, and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to rise for an hour (Check the loaf 30 minutes into rising. When the dough is close to hitting the plastic wrap, remove it; allow the dough to rise the remaining time uncovered.) When the hour of rising is up, preheat your oven to 375 degrees (F).  When the oven is up to temperature, place loaf in oven and bake for 35 – 40 minutes.

Remove loaf from pan and allow it to cool on a wire rack.  The loaf must be completely cooled before being cut into (if you can stand to leave it alone for that long!).

Note: This loaf will keep fresh for 24-48 hours, after that time, I recommend freezing it in slices to pull out and enjoy when needed. 

ORIGINAL RECIPE:

Yeast Ingredients
3 TBSP honey
1 1/4 cup warm water (between 110 – 115 degrees F)
1 TBSP active dry yeast (NOT instant yeast)

Wet Ingredients
3 eggs, at room temperature
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tsp apple cider vinegar

Dry Ingredients
1 cup millet flour
1/2 cup freshly ground oat flour**
1/2 cup sorghum flour
1/2 cup brown rice flour
1/2 cup tapioca starch
1/2 cup arrowroot starch (or potato starch – it makes my joints swell so I don’t use it)
1 TBSP xanthan gum
2 tsp baking powder
1 1/4 tsp sea salt

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Diane

Sunday 15th of November 2020

Made this bread today. I followed the recipe exactly as posted except I used Quick Rise Yeast as I didn't have the traditional one and the bread turned out beautifully. I look forward to making this bread again and playing around with different substitutions.

Mēgan

Tuesday 17th of November 2020

Very happy to hear that, Diane!

Elaine

Sunday 15th of March 2020

I've been trying various gf bread recipes for years and this is the first one I've found that consistently produces a tasty loaf that looks like regular bread. For my purposes, I converted all the dry ingredients from volume to weight measurements to make it easier to be consistent. Thank you so much for taking the time to get this one JUST RIGHT! I only wish I had found it sooner.

Mēgan

Sunday 19th of April 2020

I'm so happy to hear you enjoy it! :) Thanks for coming back here and leaving me a comment with your thoughts!

Indi

Saturday 25th of January 2020

I made the bread last night and it was so difficult waiting until the morning to eat it. The bread is delicious and beautiful to look at it lol but I wish it wasn't so high in calories.

Mēgan

Sunday 19th of April 2020

Ha! ;) I wish bread had no calories too.

Wendy W

Thursday 23rd of January 2020

I am really enjoying your rice-free bread as well as this oat-millet bread. I have celiac disease as well as many secondary allergies/intolerances. What works best for me is to rotate my foods at least 4 days apart. I know you have mentioned substituting arrowroot for tapioca, but have you (or anyone you know) ever tried an all arrowroot version of either of these two breads? If so, did it work as well? Thanks for your help.

Mēgan

Sunday 19th of April 2020

Hi Wendy, yes, I've used all arrowroot, and it turned out just fine. :)

Austin

Tuesday 3rd of December 2019

Thank you so much for this ! My daughter (21) was just diagnosed with Celiac, and I've been struggling to adapt an old family recipe for an oatmeal bread (Canadian brown bread). It's deeply rooted in our family's food history, so eliminating it was scary. This looks like just the recipe to start with, to try to get close to the original in flavor and texture. THANK YOU !!

Mēgan

Sunday 19th of April 2020

Absolutely!