Big & Soft Paleo Ginger Molasses Cookies

Oh goodness… I can’t believe it’s December! What happened to November?! In less than 2 weeks AJ and I will celebrate our 10th wedding anniversary, and then in 2 1/2 weeks it will be Christmas. It’s all coming so fast – time needs to slow down so I can get done what I want to! And actually, as far as shopping is concerned, I’m just about done; I just want more time time to fit in all of the craft and baking projects. ;)

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I have a weakness for cookies… especially ones of the ginger molasses variety (they taste SO good dunked in a cup of black coffee!). The distinct molasses and spicy ginger flavors blend so well together, and while I do like the harder ginger snaps, there’s something equally amazing about the big and soft ginger molasses cookies. These Big & Soft Paleo Ginger Molasses Cookies certainly live up to their name. They are big, and so soft they nearly melt in your mouth. Bet you can’t eat just one! ;)

OH! And speaking of cookies… my sweet and talented friend, Jeanine, of The Baking Beauties, is offering a FREE Gluten Free Cookie E-book as a Christmas present to her readers (how awesome is that??!). You can download the E-book and find out more information about it by clicking HERE

Enjoy!
xoxo,
Megan

Big & Soft Paleo Ginger Molasses Cookies

Big & Soft Paleo Ginger Molasses Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups blanched almond flour (I use either Honeyville or Anthony's)
  • 1/2 cup arrowroot starch
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoons baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil, just melted
  • 1/4 cup unsulphured molasses
  • 1/4 cup honey or pure maple syrup
  • 1 egg

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees (F).
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, arrowroot starch, coconut flour, ground ginger, baking soda, ground cinnamon, ground cloves, and sea salt.
  3. Mix in the coconut oil, unsulphured molasses, honey or pure maple syrup, and the egg and mix until combined.
  4. Refrigerate the dough for at least 2 hours.
  5. Roll heaping tablespoons of dough into balls and place them on a parchment or silicone lined baking sheet. Gently flatten the balls of dough with your fingers until they are about 1/2 inch thick.
  6. Bake for 9-12 minutes. Leave the cookies on the baking sheet to cool.
http://www.allergyfreealaska.com/2013/12/09/big-soft-paleo-ginger-molasses-cookies/

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This recipe is linked to Make Your Own Monday, Teach Me TuesdayFat TuesdaySlightly Indulgent Tuesday, Gluten Free WednesdayAllergy Free Wednesday, Frugal Day Sustainable Ways, Thank Your Body Thursday, Tasty Traditions, Full Plate Thursday, Simple Lives Thursday and Pennywise Platter, Gluten Free Fridays andWellness Weekend. 

Raw Beet, Carrot & Apple Salad with Ginger Lime Dressing

Beets are not something I would normally purchase, so working with them was a new experience (but a good one!).  After a quick search online, I found that beets are highly nutritious (especially when eaten raw) and contain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification properties.  They’ve even been thought to have anti-cancer benefits.

All the more reason to eat your beets, kids!!

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This Raw Beet, Carrot & Apple Salad with Ginger Lime Dressing is by far, one of my favorite salad. It is very refreshing, and the ginger and lime balance out the sweetness of the carrots and apple perfectly. Everyone who has tried it (even those who openly don’t like beets) have liked this salad and asked for the recipe!

Raw Beet, Carrot & Apple Salad with Ginger Lime Dressing
Serves 8
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Ingredients
  1. 3 – 4 tablespoons lime juice, fresh squeezed (or lemon)
  2. 1 tablespoons honey (or coconut nectar if you are vegan)
  3. 1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, finely grated
  4. 1-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  5. 1 3/4 cup beet roots, grated
  6. 1 3/4 cup carrots, peeled and grated
  7. 1 3/4 cup Braeburn apple, peeled and grated
Instructions
  1. To make the ginger lime dressing, combine the lime juice, honey, and ginger in a small mixing bowl. Whisk in the olive oil and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the grated beets, carrots, and apple.
  3. Toss in the dressing and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Allergy Free Alaska http://www.allergyfreealaska.com/
Enjoy!

Megan

This recipe is also linked to Raw Food Thursday, the Virtual Whole Food Potluck, Allergy Free Wednesday, Slightly Indulgent Tuesday, Simple Lives Thursday, and the Gluten Free Homemaker.

Hearty Curried Carrot Soup (vegan)

I do most of my blogging from my laptop at the dining room table, which is just off the kitchen near the glass doors leading to our backyard. I love sitting here with a nice big cup of hot coffee. I’m able to look out and watch the girls playing (either inside the house or outside in the yard), I can keep tabs on the puppy, and I also love the view.

We don’t live right in town, but we don’t live out in the country either, so my backyard is surrounded by Birch trees and Alder bushes (not the ocean or the mountains). It’s not a spectacular view, but it makes me happy. It’s very peaceful here. The leaves are starting to turn and scatter across my yard, and the crispness of fall is in the air. Soon the snow will fall, and the cold Alaskan weather will leave us craving warm temperatures and hearty hot meals.

This Curried Carrot soup is one of my favorite (meatless) hearty hot meals. I use adzuki beans to make it extra filling and creamy. Adzuki beans are small red beans that can be substituted for pinto or larger red beans in recipes. You can purchase adzuki beans online through Vitacost or Amazon, or if you’re shopping locally in the Anchorage area they can be found at Natural Pantry.

This recipe is actually not a new one, it’s been on my website for quite a while. Unfortunately it was getting overlooked because the food photography was so bad (I’m not kidding… the old picture of this soup was really bad, and didn’t leave you wanting to have a bowl of it!). I don’t know about you, but when I look at the bowl of soup below (it’s a new picture), I’d really like to eat it! Especially with a nice hearty bread roll!

Carrot Curry Soup (Medium)

This recipe has been shared at Slightly Indulgent Tuesday, EOA Link Up, Allergy Free Wednesday, Simple Lives Thursday, Wellness Weekend and Allergy Friendly Friday.

Curried Carrot Soup Recipe:
Yields 6 servings

2 tablespoons olive oil or coconut oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
2-3 garlic cloves, minced
32 ounces chicken broth (or vegetable broth for vegan)
2 cups water
2 teaspoons yellow curry powder
3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon sea salt (see recipe note below)
1 tablespoon honey (or coconut nectar for vegan)
1 1/2 pounds organic carrots, peeled and chopped
3/4 cup cooked adzuki beans (if they are canned, no salt/low sodium would be best)
1/4 – 1/3 cup canned coconut milk

  1. In a large dutch oven, warm the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until golden brown.
  2. Add the garlic, broth, water, curry powder, ginger, cinnamon, salt, sweetener of choice, carrots and adzuki beans. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, for about 20 – 25 minutes.
  3. Puree using an immersion blender until the soup is smooth.
  4. Stir in the coconut milk and taste.  Season with more sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.

Megan’s Recipe Notes:

  • I use Penzey Sweet Yellow Curry Powder. It isn’t very hot, and it has excellent flavor.
  • Pacific Natural Foods is the brand of the broth I use. If you use another brand, you might want to cut back on the amount of sea salt used in the recipe until after you puree the soup. Then taste and decide how much sea salt you’d like. Remember you can always add salt, but you can’t remove it once it’s been added.

Enjoy!
xoxo
Megan

 

Kimchi Me Crazy (dairy free/Paleo & GAPS friendly)

My best friend is half Korean. When I was 8 or 9 years old I remember sitting at her kitchen table while her mom served us lunch. I was mortified when I discovered there was seaweed in my won ton soup. My friend recognized the look of horror on my face and said, “Eat it. It’s good!” I ate it, but it took a few times for me to really develop a taste for it.

Same goes for kimchi… it took me a while to develop a taste for it, enjoy it, and to want to eat it (I only started making it a few weeks ago). My brother bought some homemade kimchi from a local Asian store, and it was phenomenal. I couldn’t stop eating it. It was a perfect balance of spicy, sweet, tangy, salty, and then you have the back note flavors of ginger and garlic. I loved it so much I had to figure out how to make it myself, just a bit healthier than some of the other recipes I’ve come across (that contain cane sugar and plenty of sweet rice flour).

My best friend recently returned from a trip to Korea and sent me some authentic Korean red pepper. You know you’re a crazy foodie when something as simple as fresh ground red pepper makes your day (but it came all the way from Korea!).  :)

I’ve made at least 3 batches of this kimchi, and people keep stealing it, so I think that’s a good sign. This stuff is addictive. Pretty soon your friends are going to steal your kimchi!

Kimchi (Medium)

There are a lot of different ways to eat kimchi. Some people enjoy eating it by itself and others with rice and meat. I’ve even heard of people making sandwiches using kimchi as the filling (which is definitely NOT my choice way of eating it). Bottom line is there is no right or wrong way to eat kimchi. Discover what you like best and enjoy it that way. :)

This recipe is linked to the GFE Gluten Free Virtual Support Group, EOA Link Up, Allergy Free Wednesdays, the Gluten Free Homemaker, Slightly Indulgent Tuesday, Frugal Days Sustainable Ways, Simple Lives Thursday, and Fat Tuesday.

Megan’s Kimchi Recipe:
Note: There are several types of ground red pepper, but make sure you use Korean red pepper in this recipe. You can buy Korean red pepper from your local Asian market.

2 heads of Napa cabbage (medium sized cabbages are best)
2 tablespoons sea salt
6 – 8 tablespoons Korean red pepper
1 3/4 tablespoons fish sauce (omit if vegan)
4 teaspoons runny honey (or coconut nectar for vegan)
1 tablespoon ginger, fresh grated
2 -3 garlic cloves, pressed
1 to 1 1/2 bunches of scallions, cut into 2 inch pieces
3 to 4 carrots, peeled and shredded

  1. Remove outer leaves from the cabbages.
  2. Cut each cabbage in half lengthwise, trim the ends, and then roughly chop it into 2 to 3 inch pieces.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, layer the chopped cabbage with the sea salt. Allow the cabbage to sit with the sea salt for about an hour; stirring occasionally (This is a good time to get your hands dirty. Stir the cabbage using your hands and don’t be afraid to squeeze it. This will help the salt draw out the moisture from the cabbage, which is a very good thing. Do not discard this liquid).
  4. Sprinkle in the Korean red pepper, fish sauce, honey, ginger, and garlic. Mix well.
  5. Stir in the scallions and carrots.
  6. Divide the kimchi into two 4-quart glass jars. Using the back of a spoon, pack the kimchi into the jars, leaving about an inch of room at the top of each jar. Make sure your kimchi has just enough liquid to be submerged. (I generally have a 1/4 to a 1/2 cup of liquid left over after I pack my jars that I end up discarding. This is an incredibly messy process for me. I make a complete mess of the jars when I’m packing my kimchi, and if you do the same, it’s okay as long as you rinse the outside of the jars and wipe the inside and outside of the rim. When fermenting vegetables, you want your jar to be as clean as possible, otherwise it may mold.)
  7. Place the lids loosely on the jars and put the jars in a shallow baking dish (in case they overflow while fermenting). Place in a cool dark area and allow the kimchi to ferment for 2 to 5 days before storing in the refrigerator. (I found it helpful to take the back of a spoon and push down on the kimchi a few times during the day while it was fermenting. It prevented my kimchi from overflowing releasef the air that built up in the jar.)

This is my cabbage after I layered it with the sea salt in my mixing bowl:

The salt eventually broke down the cabbage and drew out the moisture. Now you are ready to add the rest of your ingredients and pack the kimchi into glass jars!

Enjoy!
Megan